Engravings of Australian plants from other 19th Century botanical magazines

Decorative prints
Engravings of Australian plants from other 19th Century botanical magazines.
Curtis’ Botanical Magazine served as a model for a number of other botanical publications throughout the 19th century. The formula was essentially the same – a full page hand coloured engraving, often including close ups of stamens or other parts of the flower, with a separate page of description  .Please click on the images below to see enlargements.

 

The Botanical Register was an illustrated horticultural magazine that ran from 1815 to 1847. It was started by the botanical illustrator Sydenham Edwards, who had illustrated The Botanical Magazine for Curtis for 27 years, but left after a dispute. It was intended as a rival that would be better than the Botanical Magazine and the plates are a little larger – 140 x 240 mm ( 5½ x 9 ¼ inches).  After Edwards’ death, publisher James Ridgway took over as editor.  His successor John Lindley renamed the magazine Edwards’ Botanical Register. The prints of Australian flowers offered here are in very good condition.

 

 

PC 701 Edwards 64s

PC 701 Diplolaena Dampieri. (Dampier’s Double Cup)  West Australian flower by Miss Drake with text. Plate No 60 from The Botanical Register, 1841.  Original hand colour, excellent condition. $A 95.

PC 702 Edwards 403 1819s

PC 702 Elaeocarpus Reticulata by M Hart.  Hand-coloured engraving, plate 657, with text from The Botanical Register, 1822.  Original hand colour, very good condition  (2 unobtrusive lengthwise pressure marks). $  A70

PC 703 Edwards 657sml

PC 703 Corraea virens by Sydenham Edwards with accompanying descriptive text, plate 3 from The Botanical Register, 1815.  Original hand colour, excellent condition. $A 90                                                                                      –

 

 The Botanical Cabinet. Consisting of Coloured Delineations of Plants from all Countries was a horticultural magazine published by W. Wilson of London from 1817 to 1837. The author, George Loddiges, owned a leading plant nursery started by his father, Conrad Loddiges, which sold many exotic plants into European gardens. He built the largest hothouse in the world and linked his business with scientific botany.
The copper engravings by George Cooke are smaller than those in The Botanical Magazine but exceptionally fine. The images are 150 x 90 mm ( 6 x 3½ inches). Some are only partially coloured – perhaps this was an economy measure but it also has an interesting artistic effect.
The prints of Australian flowers offered here come from two different books. One has been bound with the pages approximately the size of the plates, the other with 20 and 30 mm margins beyond the plate mark.

 

 

PC 801 S

PC 801 Hovea longifolia, plate no 994.  160 x 100 mm, original hand colour. Good condition, wide margins, excellent condition.        $A 60.

PC 802 Loddiges Accacia discolor S

PC 802  Acacia discolor, plate no 601. 160 x 100 mm, original hand colour. Good condition, narrow margins as bound, some minor browning around the outer edges.  $A60

PC 803 Loddiges Acacia lophanta  S

PC 803  Acacia lophanta, plate no 116.  160 x 100 mm, original hand colour. Good condition, narrow margins as bound, some minor browning around the outer edges.  $A60

PC 804 Loddiges Epacris purpurascens S

PC 804  Epacris purpuraescens, plate no 237. With one page descriptive text. 163 x 100 mm (plate mark,) 220 x 152 mm (whole page), original hand colour, excellent condition. $A 70

PC 835 s

PC 835  Hakea Microcarpa, plate no 219. Original hand colour, good condition, narrow margins as bound, wrinkling of right margin. $A60

PC 838Loddiges Bossiaea heterophylla S

PC 838  Bossiaea Heterophylla, plate no 272. With one page of descriptive text. 163 x 100 mm (plate mark,) 220 x 152 mm (whole page), original hand colour, excellent condition. $A 90